Quick Answer: Why Was There A Treaty Of Waitangi?

Is New Zealand stolen land?

The New Zealand land confiscations took place during the 1860s to punish the Kingitanga movement for attempting to set up an alternative, Māori, form of government that forbade the selling of land to European settlers.

Much of the land that was never occupied by settlers was later sold by the Crown..

Why are there two versions of the Treaty of Waitangi?

There were two versions of the Treaty – one in English and one in Māori. They are not exact translations of each other. Those who signed the Treaty brought different experiences and understandings of certain words to the signing.

Why did the First Nations agree to sign treaties?

Treaty-making was historically used among First Nations peoples for such purposes as inter-tribal trade alliances, peace, friendship, safe passage, and access to shared resources within another nation’s ancestral lands.

“Currently the formal legal position of the Treaty of Waitangi is that it is legally effective in the New Zealand Courts to the extent that it is recognised in Acts of Parliament. The Treaty of Waitangi has no independent legal status.

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi controversial?

6 February 1840 The Treaty of Waitangi remains controversial. … After Hobson spoke in English, Henry Williams explained in Māori that the treaty was an act of love by the Queen and Busby emphasised that it protected land rights.

Is the Treaty of Waitangi fair?

Colonists believed the Treaty of Waitangi was fair because it offered Māori the rights of British citizens. The signing of the Treaty made it easier for settlers to acquire land. … These Pākehā were often key ‘go-betweens’, connecting settlers and Māori.

Why is the Treaty of Waitangi still important today?

The Treaty was a contract of respect between the British and Māori. … The Treaty now means there must be respect between Māori and non-Māori. It is important that the laws and rules today consider and respect both Māori and non-Māori ways of living.

What was the problem with the Treaty of Waitangi?

The land was lost through a combination of private and Government purchases, outright confiscation, and Native Land Court practices that made it difficult for Māori to maintain their land under traditional ownership structures. There were some purchases of Māori land made before the Treaty was signed.

What did the treaty promise?

Te Tiriti o Waitangi) is an important agreement that was signed by representatives of the British Crown and Māori in 1840. … The Treaty aimed to protect the rights of Māori to keep their land, forests, fisheries and treasures while handing over sovereignty to the English.

What was promised in Treaty 9?

The preamble to the treaty stated its purpose. It was to open the Northern Ontario lands “for settlement, immigration, trade, travel, mining, lumbering and other such purposes.” The Indigenous signatories were required to “cede, release, surrender and yield up…

Why did Britain want a treaty with New Zealand?

Most signed a Māori-language version. Reasons why chiefs signed the treaty included wanting controls on sales of Māori land to Europeans, and on European settlers. They also wanted to trade with Europeans, and believed the new relationship with Britain would stop fighting between tribes.

How many treaty settlements have there been?

73 settlementsAs of August 2018, 73 settlements had been passed into law. The total value of all finalised settlements is $2.24 billion. This may seem like a lot of money, but in the next 12 months, the Government will spend $14 billion on national superannuation alone.

What did the Treaty of Waitangi agree to?

In the English version, Māori cede the sovereignty of New Zealand to Britain; Māori give the Crown an exclusive right to buy lands they wish to sell, and, in return, are guaranteed full rights of ownership of their lands, forests, fisheries and other possessions; and Māori are given the rights and privileges of British …

Why was there a treaty?

In part, the treaty was an attempt to establish a system of property rights for land with the Crown controlling and overseeing land sale to prevent abuse. Initially, this worked well with the Governor and his representatives having the sole right to buy and sell land from the Māori.

What are the 3 principles of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The three “P’s”, as they are often referred to, are the principles of partnership, participation and protection. These underpin the relationship between the Government and Māori under the Treaty of Waitangi. These principles are derived from the underlying tenets of the Treaty.

Who refused the Treaty of Waitangi?

Tāraia NgākutiTāraia Ngākuti, a chief of Ngāti Tamaterā in the Coromandel, was one of many notable chiefs who refused to sign the Treaty of Waitangi. Tāraia was a famous warrior and may have felt that signing would be beneath him.

What happened after the treaty?

Shortly after the Treaty was signed, Lieutenant-Governor William Hobson proclaimed British sovereignty over the whole of New Zealand. His proclamations were ratified by the British government in October 1840. Under British law, New Zealand became technically a part of the colony of New South Wales.

What did Treaty 6 do?

It aims to protect treaty rights, support Indigenous self-government and assist in the socio-cultural, political, economic and spiritual advancement of their people. Treaty 6 peoples have also protected their treaty rights through land claims and lawsuits.

What was the main purpose of the Treaty of Waitangi?

The Treaty promised to protect Māori culture and to enable Māori to continue to live in New Zealand as Māori. At the same time, the Treaty gave the Crown the right to govern New Zealand and to represent the interests of all New Zealanders.