Question: Why Did They Create The Electoral College?

When did the electoral college start and why?

In 1804, 12th Amendment to the Constitution made sure that electors designate their votes for president and vice president, but the 12th Amendment leaves in place a tie breaking system established by the Constitution by which the House of Representatives breaks a tie on presidential electoral votes and the Senate ….

What happens if there’s a tie in the Electoral College?

If no candidate for president receives an absolute majority of the electoral votes, pursuant to the 12th Amendment, the House of Representatives is required to go into session immediately to choose a president from among the three candidates who received the most electoral votes.

Can Obama be a vice president?

Joe Biden2009–2017Barack Obama/Vice presidents

Which states split electoral votes?

As of 2008, Nebraska and Maine are the only states using the District Method of distributing electoral votes. Maine started using the method with the 1972 presidential elections and Nebraska started using the method during the election of 1992.

Who becomes vice president if the president dies?

Current order of successionNo.OfficeIncumbent1Vice PresidentMike Pence2Speaker of the House of RepresentativesNancy Pelosi3President pro tempore of the SenateChuck Grassley4Secretary of StateMike Pompeo14 more rows

Why was the Electoral College created AP Gov?

The Founding Fathers established it in the Constitution, in part, as a compromise between the election of the President by a vote in Congress and election of the President by a popular vote of qualified citizens.

What are 3 major flaws in the electoral college?

Three criticisms of the College are made: It is “undemocratic;” It permits the election of a candidate who does not win the most votes; and. Its winner-takes-all approach cancels the votes of the losing candidates in each state.

What makes the Electoral College?

When people cast their vote, they are actually voting for a group of people called electors. The number of electors each state gets is equal to its total number of Senators and Representatives in Congress. A total of 538 electors form the Electoral College. … The candidate who gets 270 votes or more wins.

When was the Electoral College ratified?

Passed by Congress December 9, 1803, and ratified June 15, 1804, the 12th Amendment provided for separate Electoral College votes for President and Vice President, correcting weaknesses in the earlier electoral system which were responsible for the controversial Presidential Election of 1800.