Question: What Are The Risk Factors For Influenza?

What is worse flu A or B?

Influenza type A and type B are similar, but type A is overall more prevalent, sometimes more severe, and can cause flu epidemics and pandemics..

What flu is going around 2020?

Influenza B Strain Dominating Early in the 2020 Flu Season.

How can you prevent influenza?

Healthy Habits to Help Prevent FluAvoid close contact. Avoid close contact with people who are sick. … Stay home when you are sick. If possible, stay home from work, school, and errands when you are sick. … Cover your mouth and nose. … Clean your hands. … Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth. … Practice other good health habits.

What are 3 symptoms of influenza?

Flu Symptomsfever* or feeling feverish/chills.cough.sore throat.runny or stuffy nose.muscle or body aches.headaches.fatigue (tiredness)some people may have vomiting and diarrhea, though this is more common in children than adults.

How can I get rid of the flu fast without medicine?

ContinuedDrink plenty of fluids. You need lots of liquids when you have a fever.Breathe hot air. Hang out in a steamy shower or cover your head with a towel and hold it over a sinkful of hot water to ease dry throats and nasal passages.Don’t take antibiotics . … Eat healthy. … Don’t smoke. … Keep the flu to yourself.

How can I prevent the flu from spreading in my house?

Keep your hands away from your face. Since you can’t wash your hands all the time, make a habit of not touching your face. Keep your hands away from your eyes, nose and mouth to prevent germs from entering your body. Disinfecting surfaces will help kill flu germs.

What should I eat to prevent flu?

The American Dietetic Association says eating healthfully is a great way to boost immunity and prevent flu. Diets that are plentiful in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, lean protein, low-fat dairy, healthy fats, and more can provide a wide array of nutrients and antioxidants that can help boost the immune system.

What are the stages of flu?

What to expect with the fluDays 1–3: Sudden appearance of fever, headache, muscle pain and weakness, dry cough, sore throat and sometimes a stuffy nose.Day 4: Fever and muscle aches decrease. Hoarse, dry or sore throat, cough and possible mild chest discomfort become more noticeable. … Day 8: Symptoms decrease.

Can you have the flu without a fever?

A fever is part of the immune system’s response to an infection and is a typical flu symptom. However, it is possible for the flu to occur without a fever. In mild cases of the flu, the body may be able to fight off the influenza virus without raising its temperature.

How can I prevent the flu naturally?

Natural Flu Prevention TipsWash Your Hands Thoroughly & Frequently. Although the flu is an airborne illness, it is often transmitted by shaking hands and touching frequently used surfaces. … Keep Your Space. Try to stay about six feet away from others when possible. … Stay Active. … Sleep Tight. … Eat a Nutrient-Rich Diet.

How is the common flu spread?

Person to Person People with flu can spread it to others up to about 6 feet away. Most experts think that flu viruses spread mainly by droplets made when people with flu cough, sneeze or talk. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

Who is at high risk for influenza?

High-risk groups for the flu Children younger than 5, but especially children younger than 2 years old. Adults 65 years of age and older. Pregnant women (and women up to two weeks postpartum). Residents of nursing home and other long-term care facilities.

What are 3 ways you can reduce your risk of getting influenza?

There are five essential strategies to avoid catching the flu.Get a flu shot. … Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water. … Avoid touching your eyes, mouth, and nose. … Avoid crowds. … Disinfect contaminated surfaces.

Who is the most from the flu?

The same CID study found that children are most likely to get sick from flu and that people 65 and older are least likely to get sick from influenza. Median incidence values (or attack rate) by age group were 9.3% for children 0-17 years, 8.8% for adults 18-64 years, and 3.9% for adults 65 years and older.